Jobs With Pets

imagesPet jobs can encompass many things the least of which is a job held at a pet store. There can be a variety of pet jobs to choose from, like working at a zoo, or animal shelter, or perhaps even a pet store. You could always find pet jobs around your neighborhood as well. After all walking the neighborhood dogs can be considered as a pet job, right? What do I mean by pet jobs then? Basically I’m talking about jobs that entail your handling or coming into contact with animals of all shapes and sizes. This can cover many things as you must be aware, but what would you be expected to do on any of these pet jobs. If you were working in a pet store there a few jobs that you would definitely have to do and these would encompass a large number of responsibilities.
From feeding all the animals first thing in the morning, and in most cases last thing before you leave as well, to cleaning out their various cages and hutches etc. You would be required to help customers who come into the shop, and be able to direct them knowledgably through the store. If they ask you a question about the various animals and paraphernalia that they can find in store you should know about it. And if they have questions regarding the requirements of their pets you should be able to answer those as well. It’s not required that you can do all of this from the beginning but it does help. And if you don’t know the answer to any of the questions you should be able to admit it and go find someone who does know the answers and get them to help the customer. The same applies if you’re working at a zoo, but without the whole customer part.

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Our New Pets: Ants!

indexThe eerie blue glow from the corner of my sons’ bedroom is a familiar sight each night. While the rest of us are awake, asleep, here, and even away, a flurry of activity is going on inside the sealed plastic container, illuminated by four small lights on the underside, shining up through a sea of blue gel. It is a peaceful image from the outside, and my sons will sit forever and watch it. It is their new passion. It is their ant farm. It wasn’t always this way. I was out of the pet business and had been for a while. We had reclaimed our backyard after our aging canine friends went to “doggie heaven”, and pets were not something I was looking to take on at the moment.
But, children have an agenda of their own, at least mine do. And getting a new pet – of any kind – was tops on the list. We had been through all the possibilities – fish (which we did end up getting), rabbits, mice (um, NO), birds, and lizards. I offered to let them adopt a Chia pet or even a battery operated animal, but they were firm in their demands. They wanted something alive, something interesting, and something none of their friends had. I just wanted something that I didn’t have to feed or clean up after. And that’s how we found our ant farm. It isn’t just ANY ant farm, though. This is the cream of the crop. It is made with a special transparent gel that contains all of the nutrients the little buggers need to survive. Actually, it is modeled after an experiment from a space shuttle mission to study the effects of micro-gravity on ants. Everything the ants need to build and live is included in the “farm”. And, from the moment you introduce them to their new home, you are hooked. It takes them a short while to get started (they have to check out their new digs first), but once the tunnel building begins, you realize how worth it this is to house about 30 insects in your home – WILLINGLY. Harvester ants are the best; they have large mandibles and make massive tunnels. Their size makes them easy to watch.

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Training Pets

ssnb snDogs mostly are more intelligent than most people realise. They understand far more than we give them credit for. And, by using this canine inherent ability we can soon have pets doing anything we ask of them. A big secret in training animals is using their inherent abilities to our advantage. With dogs, this inherent ability could relate to their ancestral purpose, such as hunting, so ingrained in terriers or with kelpies or border collies that love to muster almost anything that moves! Those dog breeds that love to hunt are dogs that also love to seek things out, while other dogs love to muster. These traits are things that dogs just love doing naturally, and we can use these traits to make it fun for pets to learn new things. I once had a Jack Russell terrier called Pippy and she loved to muster cattle and sheep. She became one of my best “cattle dogs!” working with a kelpie and collie.
This goes to prove you need to watch what your dog loves doing and use this trait to advantage when teaching. This also applies to goats. My wife raised two orphan Angora Kids goats. They were snow white and were smaller than a toy poodle. They loved to sit on my wife’s lap in the lounge room and watch T.V. with her. Their names were Charlie and Jeanie. My 14 year old son took a liking to Jeanie and soon had her doing all sorts of tricks. He simply used the goat’s natural ability and love of jumping up onto chairs, rocks or any high object, a sort of King of the Castle game that goats seem to like doing. Anyway, in a short time he had Jeanie learning to jump from one 12 litre oil drum top to another, several lined up in a row. It was a simple task to teach Jeanie to jump onto the first barrel, then jump to the next, and jump four more in a row. At the last barrel my son would extend his arms out to Jeanie and call her and she would launch herself into his arms. She did this simply because she loved jumping on things, which my son simply exploited.

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A Look At Snowbirds And Their Pets

fnhrhfLong before winter’s blustery chill begins to sting the bones, plans are being made by people in Canada, the Northeast and Midwestern United States to seek the warmer climes of the south. It’s an interesting phenomenon that occurs each year and mimics the migration ritual of our feathered friends. These “snowbirds” (as they are affectionately called) flock to Arizona, Florida and other places along the Sunbelt to avoid winter’s bite and inconvenience. Northern Europeans also are known to head to warmer places in the U.S., adding to these second communities of seasonal residents each year. Snowbirds are typically retirees or business owners who can afford to be away for extended periods of time. Many have a second home in a warmer location, while others take their home on wheels with them in the form of an RV or camper. Jack and Ethel W. have been making the trip for 18 years.
Pulling out of their snow-banked driveway in upstate Ohio, their 28-foot Fleetwood Southwind RV is loaded with rations, lighter clothes than they would have needed had they stayed home, and Phantom, their four-legged, eight-year-old. That’s right, more and more people travel with their pets these days and snowbirds are no exception. The couple wouldn’t dream of leaving behind their special member of the family, a Lhasa Apso. He’s like one of their children. They’ll stay gone five or six weeks in southern Georgia, while taking several side trips to explore new places. Rick S. pulls his 38-foot Prowler fifth wheel from Connecticut to Florida each year. His only passengers are Harley and Davidson, two 80-pound German shepherds who earn their keep by sharing “navigator” duties as Rick mans all the driving. He heads south in early November, not to return until mid-April. He enjoys the warmer weather fishing with his pals at his modest lake house until the last signs of the northern winter dissipate.

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Seizures In Pets

pet-sitting-pgWitnessing your precious dog or cat having a seizure can be a most frightening experience. During seizures pets often lose control, fall over, chomp their teeth, salivate or drool, whine, paddle with their feet, and begin to urinate or deficate on themselves. Their eyes become large (dilated) and unresponsive. A pet caregiver feels panicked and helpless while watching it all happen. Hopefully, you and your pet have never, and will never, have to experience this shocking event. But, if you have, or if you experience it in the future, this article will help you to understand what causes seizures, what you can do while your pet is having a seizure, and the various treatment options available. What causes seizures? Epilepsy is one cause.
Certain dog breeds are more susceptible to epilepsy. These include: cocker spaniels; poodles; collies; german shepherds; irish setters; golden retrievers; dachshunds, labrador retrievers, saint bernards, miniature schnauzers, siberian huskies, and wire-haired terriers. Veterinarians are not sure what causes this “hereditary” epilepsy. In cats hereditary epilepsy is unusual. Vets can normally find the cause of seizures. These include chemical toxins (which includes chemical preservatives used in many pet foods), brain tumors, feline leukemia, feline infections, peritonitis, feline AIDS, head trauma, and problems with the liver and kidneys. In dogs there are many causes of seizures besides hereditary epilepsy. Allergies to food and the chemicals, preservatives, and artificial flavors put into the foods can cause seizures. Other causes include liver and kidney disease, tumors, poisonings, and low blood sugars. What can you do while your pet is having a seizure? Try to stay calm. This is hard to do, but using a calm, reassuring quiet voice will comfort your dog or cat. Move any furniture or other objects on which your pet could hurt itself. If you’re unable to move the object, place pillows or wrap blankets between the pet and the object. Slide something soft under your pet’s head, but be sure to keep your hands and face away from his head so that you don’t risk a possible bite.

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